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Hyannis Country Garden Blog
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Grow A Little Love

When we put plants that speak to our hearts in the garden, we’re always growing a little love. Maybe it’s a peony that reminds you of your grandmother. Perhaps you get joy from plants with fragrant flowers, or those with a particular color of blooms. Some feel their spirits lifted when they add plants that support pollinators and birds to their garden. In these situations, our plantings are truly life-affirming.

But another way to grow some love is when you use plants with heart-shaped leaves. From many varieties of Hosta and Epimedium to the annual moonflower vine, there are several plants with foliage that looks like a green valentine. Perhaps the plant that comes to mind most for growing hearts is the redbud tree.

Cercis canadensis, aka eastern redbud, is a small tree that is native to the northeast. Since it doesn’t grow huge it’s very appropriate for smaller landscapes. Redbuds do well in full to part sun, and best of all, there are several varieties that have colorful foliage.

Here are three we have in the garden center right now. They are perfect for honoring a birthday, wedding or anniversary. Or plant them just because they make you smile.

Ruby Falls is a weeping variety with purple foliage. Being narrow, they make good upright focal point plants in smaller spaces.

Ruby Falls is a weeping variety with purple foliage. Being narrow, they make good upright focal point plants in smaller spaces.

'Ace of Hearts' is prized for its compact habit, semi-glossy leaves on zig-zag stems, and a dense canopy .

‘Ace of Hearts’ is prized for its compact habit, semi-glossy leaves on zig-zag stems, and a dense canopy .

The Rising Sun redbud has several colors of leaves on the plant well into the summer. Lime green is the predominant shade, with smaller peach-colored foliage and splashes of darker green variegation. Grow Rising Sun in full sun to part sun.

The Rising Sun redbud has several colors of leaves on the plant well into the summer. Lime green is the predominant shade, with smaller peach-colored foliage and splashes of darker green variegation. An artist’s plant for sure! Grow Rising Sun in full sun to part sun.

Ways to Make Watering Easier

Early in the season we had plenty of rainfall, but as the summer goes on most people find that they need to water their plants. Even those who have automatic irrigation systems often need to target specific areas with additional ways to deliver moisture since tall plants can block in-ground sprinklers, or the usual lawn irrigation not enough for hydrangeas or newly placed plants.

Here are some products that will make your watering easier.

Every yard needs at least one rain gauge so that you know how much moisture Mother Nature delivered. The ideal for keeping established plants in good shape is an inch of water every week. Be aware that an inch of water in a tuna can, bucket, wheelbarrow or other container with a wide opening is NOT equivalent to an inch measured in a rain gauge.

Every yard needs at least one rain gauge so that you know how much moisture Mother Nature delivered. The ideal for keeping established plants in good shape is an inch of water every week. Be aware that an inch of water in a tuna can, bucket, wheelbarrow or other container with a wide opening is NOT equivalent to an inch measured in a rain gauge.

Soaker hoses are great for delivering water at the base of a plant without splashing the foliage. If your soil is sandy be sure to zig-zag the hose back and forth since the moisture tends to go straight down in sand.

Soaker hoses are great for delivering water at the base of a plant without splashing the foliage. They are also good for supplemental watering of plants like hydrangeas. You can lay down a soaker hose around plants, cover it with mulch, and then hook your regular hose to it for watering when needed. If your soil is sandy be sure to zig-zag the hose back and forth since the moisture tends to go straight down in sand. 

These simple timers aren't expensive and they allow you to put the sprinkler on  before leaving the house for errands, appointments etc.

These simple timers aren’t expensive and they allow you to put the sprinkler on before leaving the house for errands, appointments etc. 

There is a sprinkler to fit every size garden and budget. Come into the store and learn which one best meets your needs.

There is a sprinkler to fit every size garden and budget. Come into the store and learn which one best meets your needs. Each type of sprinkler has different advantages; for example, Gardena products all attach using the same connector, and it comes away from the sprinkler so you can attach it to the hose easily without having to juggle the actual sprinkler at the same time.

It is my goal to have every hose on my property be a Flexzilla! They are easy to un-kink with a shake, stay soft in cold weather and are oh-so-flexible. Safe for people and pet drinking, organic gardening too.

It is my goal to have every hose on my property be a Flexzilla! They are easy to un-kink with a shake, stay soft in cold weather and are oh-so-flexible. Safe for people and pet drinking, organic gardening too.

A watering wand is a must-have tool for keeping containers watered. They allow you to adjust the flow of the water so that soil isn't pushed out of the pots or foliage needlessly dampened. This purple wand is made by Dramm and also comes in other colors. A watering wand makes it easier to water hanging baskets and window boxes.

A watering wand is a must-have tool for keeping containers watered. They allow you to adjust the flow of the water so that soil isn’t pushed out of the pots or foliage needlessly dampened. This purple wand is made by Dramm and also comes in other colors. A watering wand makes it easier to water hanging baskets and window boxes.

There are wands with long or short handles, and adjustable hose heads without the pole as well.

There are wands with long or short handles, and adjustable hose heads without the pole as well.

Cape Cod Hydrangea Festival

As people all over Cape Cod begin touring gardens during the Cape Cod Hydrangea Festival, we thought it appropriate to post a few hydrangea facts this week. Here are a few facts and tips about Cape Cod’s favorite shrub:

  • There is a hydrangea for every garden! If you have a sunny yard, plant one of the Hydrangea paniculata varieties.  The blue and pink mopheads and lacecap flowers last longest when they are planted in part-shade. If you need a hydrangea that stays short there are many varieties in all colors that grow two to four feet tall.
  • It’s a myth that putting rusty nails or nickels around the plants will turn the flowers blue. Varieties that have variable color will be blue in acidic soils and pink in alkaline soils. If you have a blue hydrangea that has turned pink, it’s probably growing near a cement walkway, foundation, stone dusted patio or a lawn that’s been limed.
  • There is no way to make a blue/pink hydrangea short if it’s a tall-growing variety. No matter when you cut the plant back it will replace its growth in one summer…and you’ll have few to no flowers as well.  Download and print a sheet about how to prune mophead and lacecap hydrangeas here, but know that you should be pruning for appearance not to control size. If your plant is too large, move it in the fall or spring.
  • Fertilizer won’t make the stems of your plants stronger. Those large hydrangea flowers are heavy and will bend stems down, especially when they are wet. There are simple ways to stake a flopping hydrangea shrub without making the plant look like it’s in bondage. See a quick stake and twine method here.
  • Blue mophead flowers dry best when they are cut later in the season. Wait until that fresh blue changes to lavender and the petals look papery. Cut the flowers and either place them in a vase or hang upside down until they are dry.

    Hyannis Country Garden is the proud sponsor of this year's collectible Hydrangea Festival poster. Each year a local artist's work is chosen. This lovely painting is by Susan A. Hollis.

    Hyannis Country Garden is the proud sponsor of this year’s collectible Hydrangea Festival poster. Each year a local artist’s work is chosen. This lovely painting is by Susan A. Hollis.

Late June Veggie Garden Problems

Do you grow vegetables? If so, here are some situations you might be dealing with, their causes and the organic solutions.

Small Holes in Leaves
Cause: flea beetles
Solution: dust plants with diatomaceous earth, reapply after a rain. Usually two or three applications will be enough knock the beetles down to acceptable levels.

Shredded Leaves, Ragged Holes
Cause: earwigs
Solution: dust plants with diatomaceous earth, reapply after a rain. Usually two or three applications will be enough knock the earwigs down to acceptable levels.

Disappearing Seedlings
Cause: earwigs, slugs or bunnies
Solution: if your newly germinated seedlings are disappearing, they are being eaten. This is usually due to the critters listed above. Diatomaceous earth works for the earwigs and slugs, but if you suspect rabbit damage you’ll have to cover the planting areas with floating row cover or netting. Don’t worry – you can still replant various crops and they will catch up quickly once the sun comes out!

Brown Spots on Pepper Plants
Cause: leaf spot fungus
Solution: pick off leaves that are yellowing and spray plants with Serenade. Repeat this spray two or three times after seven days to protect newly growing leaves. Usually pepper plants grow out of leaf spot situations once the weather gets warmer and sunnier. It’s worse in damp, cool weather.

Tomatoes Not Growing Much
Cause: cool, damp weather
Solution: sunshine and heat! Hopefully the weather will get more summer-like in the next two weeks. Tomatoes like hot, sunny weather.  In the meantime, spray your tomato foliage with Serenade to discourage and suppress early blight, the fungal disease that is most common on the Cape.

Here are flea beetles (circled) and the damage on Broccoli Rabe. Flea beetles also love eggplant and chard, but can be seen on other crops as well.

Here are flea beetles (circled) and the damage on Broccoli Rabe. Flea beetles also love eggplant and chard, but can be seen on other crops as well.

Do you have a garden problem not covered here? Bring photos or bagged samples into the store and we’ll help you diagnose what’s going on and find a good solution.

June is Perennial Month

June is a month when gardeners and garden centers celebrate perennial plants. And there are so many to enjoy! Perennials are wonderful in the landscape because they come in all shapes, sizes and colors. But just as people come with assorted appearances and personalities, perennial plants do as well. The secret to having a good perennial garden is to choose the right plant for your location and needs.

Some perennials never have to be touched, while others require frequent editing, dividing, or other maintenance. A few perennials flower for a very short time while others stay in bloom for a month or more. There are plants that will live for years and others that are labeled “perennial” that only last a year or two in the garden. Finally, some perennials thrive in sunny locations but not in shade, and others have just the opposite requirements. In order to help you choose a plant that will do well for years on Cape Cod, we’ve prepared a list of great plants that you can download and print.

 

This photo shows one reason that people like lady's mantle. The leaves hold the drops of water and display them like diamonds on green velvet. The flowers on this perennial are also great for bouquets.

This photo shows one reason that people like lady’s mantle. The leaves hold the drops of water and display them like diamonds on green velvet. The flowers on this perennial are also great for bouquets. Note that this perennial can self-seed if the faded flowers aren’t removed before it goes to seed. This makes it a good ground cover plant in part-shade but those who don’t want to dig baby lady’s mantle plants out of their landscape should promptly deadhead the flower stems.

Need color in part-shade? Have we got some suggestions for you! Heuchera plants come with leaves of many colors.

Need color in part-shade? Have we got some suggestions for you! Heuchera plants come with leaves of many colors. The flowers range from white to coral, which is where their common name, coral bells, comes from.

There aren't many plants that flower in the winter, thrive in shade and have pretty green calyx that make the plants seem to be in flower for months afterwards. If you don't have hellebores, you must plant some!

There aren’t many plants that flower in the winter, thrive in shade and have pretty green calyx that make the plants seem to be in flower for months afterwards. If you don’t have hellebores, you must plant some!

Daylilies and Echinacea make the July garden come alive with color.

Daylilies and Echinacea make the July garden come alive with color. This garden has three different Echinacea varieties: Milkshake (white), Even Saul (coral to pink) and Guava Ice.  The blue flower is an annual, but this garden has such a range of perennials that there is always something coming into bloom.

 

Why Every Garden Needs Annuals

Most of our customers love flowers…the more the better. Flowering shrubs and trees are great for dependable, lower-maintenance color. Perennials provide an ever changing kaleidoscope of flowers that open at different points in the season. But even with a good selection of all of these plants, a garden needs annuals.

Unlike perennials and shrubs, most annuals bloom all summer. Many are in flower when they’re planted, and will continue to blossom until hard frost in October or beyond. Annuals provide that bridge color that can unite and carry a perennial garden through the entire season. They spill out of window boxes and containers, provide a flowering carpet for the shrubs, and can even make your vegetable garden the best dressed bed on the block.

Here’s a tip for planting annuals: Mix equal parts of Osmocote and Plant-tone fertilizers in a bucket. Before planting a container, combine a small handful of this mix into the potting soil. Before planting annuals in the ground, scatter this mix lightly over the surface of the entire area you’re planting. When you place the annuals in the ground, some of this mix will get turned into the soil and the rest of it will stay on the surface. Given this treatment, you won’t have to fertilize again all summer long.

Here are some annuals that are especially good for combining with shrubs and perennials:

This CityLine Paris Hydrangea is perfectly set off by the lime green sweet potato vine and the Pretty Much Picasso Supertunia from Proven Winners.

This CityLine Paris Hydrangea is perfectly set off by the lime green sweet potato vine and the Pretty Much Picasso Supertunia from Proven Winners.

This photo was taken in late September and you can see how colorful the garden still is. This perennial bed had flowering poppies and peonies early in the season but it is the Sunpatiens (pink), yellow Bidens Goldilocks Rocks, white Frosty Knight Lobularia, and blue annual Salvia that have provided the color all summer. On the right of the photo you see annual ornamental kale. These have been planted where the peonies once stood. In early September the peonies are cut down, and the annual kale will be attractive here past New Years.

This photo was taken in late September and you can see how colorful the garden still is. This perennial bed had flowering poppies and peonies early in the season but it is the Sunpatiens (pink), yellow Bidens Goldilocks Rocks, white Frosty Knight Lobularia, and blue annual Salvia that have provided the color all summer. On the right of the photo you see annual ornamental kale. These have been planted where the peonies once stood. In early September the peonies are cut down, and the annual kale will be attractive here past New Years.

The annuals in this perennial garden are: Blue Horizon Ageratum (tall blue), Sedona Coleus, and the deep apricot Profusion Zinnias. All will be colorful into October.

The annuals in this perennial garden are: Blue Horizon Ageratum (tall blue), Sedona Coleus, and the deep apricot Profusion Zinnias. All will be colorful into October.

The large white puddles of flowers are Snow Princess Lobularia, and annual that frequently lasts through Thanksgiving. This year I planted them with Bidens Campfire Fireburst and Golden Delicious Pineapple Sage. The purple in the background is a Volcano Phlox perennial.

The large white puddles of flowers are Snow Princess Lobularia, and annual that frequently lasts through Thanksgiving. This year I planted them with Bidens Campfire Fireburst and Golden Delicious Pineapple Sage. The purple in the background is a Volcano Phlox perennial.

My Leaves Have Brown Spots!

Although the regular rain has been welcomed after last summer’s drought, so far the spring and early summer weather on Cape Cod has been cool and damp. This combination is pretty much a prescription for fungal problems. We’ve had customers come in with fungal conditions on lawns, perennials and shrubs. Here is a rundown of what you might be seeing in your landscape:

Blackspot is starting on roses.
Peonies have black buds that won’t open.
Lilacs have black leaf edges and flowers that brown quickly.
Hydrangeas have black spots on their leaves.
Apple trees show darkening foliage or have rusty spots on the underside of leaves.

Here’s the bottom line: none of these will kill the plants but they may look badly as a result. You can spray with a fungicide, but that only helps protect unblemished foliage…it won’t cure already infected plant tissues.

In addition to these conditions, this cool and damp weather is perfect for Impatiens Downy Mildew to be active on the regular Impatiens. So if you’ve planted regular impatiens and they start dropping their leaves and showing bare stems, chances are the downy mildew has hit once again.

Peony buds get a form of botrytis in cold, damp weather that can cause the flowers to shrivel and die before they can open.  If this happens to you, start spraying with Serenade next year as the flower buds form in order to protect them.

Peony buds get a form of botrytis in cold, damp weather that can cause the flowers to shrivel and die before they can open. If this happens to you, start spraying with Serenade next year as the flower buds form in order to protect them.

Spraying roses regularly will slow blackspot although it won't cure it. Use a fungicide labeled for blackspot on roses - we have several so come into the store to talk about the various options.

Spraying roses regularly will slow blackspot although it won’t cure it. Use a fungicide labeled for blackspot on roses – we have several so come into the store to talk about the various options.

Here is how leaf-spot fungus looks on Annabelle Hydrangeas. This is a cosmetic problem - the plant won't be harmed long term.

Here is how leaf-spot fungus looks on Annabelle Hydrangeas. This is a cosmetic problem – the plant won’t be harmed long term.

Apple trees are prone to several fungal problems in wet, cool weather. Those that tend to get cedar apple rust will show symptoms more quickly.

Apple trees are prone to several fungal problems in wet, cool weather. Those that tend to get cedar apple rust will show symptoms more quickly.

Lilacs get another form of botrytis that causes leaves to be spotted or have black edges. In constant moisture the flowers can brown as well.

Lilacs get another form of botrytis that causes leaves to be spotted or have black edges. In constant moisture the flowers can brown as well.

There are several fungicides that can help slow the progression of fungal problems. From organic sprays such as Serenade to systemic products, we will help you get what you need to slow diseases while we wait for the sun to return!

There are several fungicides that can help slow the progression of fungal problems. From organic sprays such as Serenade to systemic products, we will help you get what you need to slow diseases while we wait for the sun to return!

Some Basics About Fertilizers

At Hyannis Country Garden there’s an entire wall devoted to fertilizers. This selection is wonderful in that our customers are sure to find just the right product for their needs…but it can also be bewildering. We frequently help people who are confused about which product to buy. “Can I use this on all my flowers or just on the roses?” “Do I need a separate fertilizer for my tomatoes?” or “What’s the best one for my shrubs?” are all questions we hear frequently.

Here are a few basic tips to make your fertilizing decisions less daunting.

In general, we recommend organic fertilizers for trees, shrubs, and perennials. Organics feed these plants slowly over time and don’t push fast growth that might also be weak. You can apply an organic fertilizer such as Holly-tone (for acid loving plants and most evergreens) or Flower-tone (for all other shrubs and perennials) anytime except July, August and September. Some people choose to do lighter applications spring and fall, while others want to only spread it once in the spring.

Organic fertilizers take about 6 weeks to become available to plants so don’t expect an “overnight green-up.” With these products, slow and steady wins the race!

This section of our fertilizer department has all the Espoma products. Many of these are organic fertilizers but there are some synthetic products such as a 10-10-10 as well.

This section of our fertilizer department has all the Espoma products. Many of these are organic fertilizers but there are some synthetic products such as a 10-10-10 as well.

Most people choose to also use organic fertilizers on their vegetables. If this is your preference, mixing some Plant-tone in the bed in the spring, and following up with a liquid such as Neptune’s Harvest in the summer. Fish or fish and seaweed is an organic fertilizer that’s available more quickly than other organics, so it makes a good mid-summer feed.

These are great products to use on any of your outdoor plants. Many vegetable gardeners use fish and seaweed as their middle of the summer fertilizer.

These are great products to use on any of your outdoor plants. Many vegetable gardeners use fish and seaweed as their middle of the summer fertilizer.

Annuals tend to do better with at least some synthetic fertilizers. The combination I use is a time-release synthetic such as Osmocote, mixed with an organic such as Plant-tone. Many of the new annuals need a fertilizer that’s higher in nitrogen (the first number on the label) because they flower on new growth and the nitrogen stimulates that development. So mixing equal parts of these two products and mixing them into your containers or annual beds will provide the correct amount of fertilizer all summer long.

This synthetic fertilizer releases over time but the more frequently you water, and the higher the temperature, the faster the product is released.

This synthetic fertilizer releases over time but the more frequently you water, and the higher the temperature, the faster the product is released.

Don’t throw fertilizer in the bottom of a hole when you plant! The roots will grow away from that small deposit fairly quickly. Instead, scatter it over the entire surface of the area where plants are being installed. As you plant some of the product will get mixed into the soil and the rest will feed from the top down as it breaks down into the soil. Bio-tone is a good fertilizer to use when planting.

There are special fertilizers for just about every plant from tomatoes to cacti, but it’s possible for you to use a general product over most of your landscape and indoor plants. Come into the store and we’ll be happy to guide you to what makes most sense for your yard and gardens.

Here are some general recommendations we make for common Cape Cod Plants.
Hydrangeas: use Holly-tone if you want them to stay blue.
Perennials: Flower-tone
Rhododendrons and Holly: Holly-tone
Trees: Flower-tone or Holly-tone
Roses: Rose-tone

Never assume that you know what your soil fertility is! Taking samples and having soil tested every two to three years is always a good idea. The University of Massachusetts Soil Testing Lab is the place to send samples, and full instructions can be found on their website.

Coast of Maine has some excellent organic fertilizers that target specific nutrients.

Coast of Maine has some excellent organic fertilizers that target specific nutrients. Once you have your soil test results you’ll know if one of these is the best for your garden.

We have a wide selection of fertilizers, both organic and synthetic, and we can help you find just the right product for your plants.

We have a wide selection of fertilizers, both organic and synthetic, and we can help you find just the right product for your plants.

Now the answers to those common questions we started out with.

“Can I use this on all my flowers or just on the roses?” You can use Rose-tone or other rose fertilizers for your other perennials and flowering shrubs.

“Do I need a separate fertilizer for my tomatoes?” No, you can use any general fertilizer for all the vegetables in your garden, or you can use Tomato-tone on the entire veggie garden, not just the tomatoes.

“What’s the best one for my shrubs?” In general, you could use Holly-tone for all of the shrubs that keep their leaves all winter, as well as the hydrangeas. And you could use Flower-tone on everything else.

Finally, always read the label on the product you’re using and mix or apply at the recommended rate! Too much fertilizer does more harm than good.

Your Trees Are Being Eaten

From a distance, all looks well as the grass greens up, the perennials emerge and the trees break dormancy. But a close look at the trees and roses on the Cape will show that there is trouble in paradise…winter moth  and gypsy moth larvae have both hatched and are eating away.

Here are just two examples from a birch tree and a beach on my property in Sandwich. The larvae are very small right now, and are taking small bites. But as they grow they will do more damage, so treating with Captain Jacks (active ingredient, spinosad) at this point will help prevent greater loss of leaves. I spray smaller trees and roses with a pump sprayer, and larger trees with a hose-end sprayer. Even if you can’t spray the entire large tree, a great number of larvae will be killed by covering the bottom most branches. Using Trubo spreader sticker in either sprayer is a good idea as it helps the spinosad stick on the leaves.

Here are the tiny gypsy moths at work on a birch leaf. They aren't noticeable from a distance, but up close you can see them and the small holes they're making in the leaves.

Here are the tiny gypsy moths at work on a birch leaf. They aren’t noticeable from a distance, but up close you can see them and the small holes they’re making in the leaves.

From a distance this beech tree looks just fine, but when you look closely you'll find tiny holes that show the presence of the winter moth larvae.

From a distance this beech tree looks just fine, but when you look closely you’ll find tiny holes that show the presence of the winter moth larvae.

Look closely at your maple trees, crabapples, pears, birch and roses. Treat the plants before or after they bloom so that you won’t spray wet spinosad onto foraging bees. (Dry spinosad isn’t a problem but avoid spraying when bees are on a plant.)

Captain Jack's Deadbug Brew and Turbo are the products of choice for both winter moth and gypsy moth larvae, and it's most effective when the larvae are small.

Captain Jack’s Deadbug Brew and Turbo are the products of choice for both winter moth and gypsy moth larvae, and it’s most effective when the larvae are small.

Terrific Tulips and Tulip Troubles

Recently I sat on my deck and watched the first hummingbird of the season visit my trough of tulips. For the entire month of April the developing tulips have made me smile. Elsewhere in the yard their cheerful flowers bloom red, yellow, pink and purple, complementing the daffodils and other spring flowers. Tulips are terrific.

Some people have trouble with tulips, however, so here are a few tips about possible tulip problems.

  • Our customers ask: “I got some flowering tulips this spring – can I plant them outside?” Yes! Place them in the ground asap. Bury the bulb down about 6″ however – you’ll see that you’ll be burying part of the leaves, but that’s OK. It’s better for the bulb to be at the proper depth. Don’t cut the leaves or stem off – leave these in place, and after watering well apply some liquid fertilizer to help boost the strength in the bulb. Wait to remove the stem and leaves until after they’ve turned yellow.
  • “I planted tulips last fall and the squirrels dug them up!” Squirrels are curious when they sense disturbed soil. They think there might be a tasty nut or some other treasure there, so they dig the bulb up and toss it aside. To prevent this in future years, water the area well after planting bulbs to settle the soil and then apply a layer of animal repellant over the surface after watering.
  • “Something snapped the heads off my tulips!” This is the most frustrating thing! You just begin to enjoy the cheerful tulip colors and something either breaks them or eats the flowers. Deer and woodchucks eat tulip flowers. Occasionally a rabbit will nibble the tulip bloom but they don’t usually eat the entire flower at one sitting. Use a deer and rabbit repellant in the future, spraying the entire plant early as the tulips just come up. If the flowers are left lying on the ground, that’s most likely the work of squirrels. No, they aren’t just being vandals…they are drinking the water that flows up the stem! Sprinkle new tulips with red pepper or spray with a repellant that contains cayenne pepper.
  • “My tulips stopped flowering. I only have foliage now.” Some tulips are more prone to returning for several years, and others might only last two or three seasons. For the longest lasting tulips, look for Darwin hybrids. Even these tend to peter out after four years, however. For the best tulip displays, plant some every fall. Additionally, when the tulips have finished flowering leave the stems and foliage in the garden and fertilize with the liquid fertilizer of your choice. The stem and foliage will be building up strength in the bulb for next year.
  • “I put tulips in my containers in the fall and they rotted.” To have bulbs last over the winter in a container, use a very large pot or box and fresh soil. Be sure that there is at least one drainage hole. Used soil doesn’t drain well because the roots of the plants that formerly grew there prevent the water from moving through the soil quickly.
    Tulips attract hummingbirds to the spring garden. They are good cutting flowers, and are a cheerful sight in the landscape for at least four weeks.

    Tulips attract hummingbirds to the spring garden. They are good cutting flowers, and are a cheerful sight in the landscape for at least four weeks.

    Tulips that grew in pots can be transplanted into the yard and garden. Leave the green foliage on until it turns yellow.

    Tulips that grew in pots can be transplanted into the yard and garden. Leave the green foliage on until it turns yellow.